Diwali 5-part special: “The Curse of the Comeback”

This Diwali “Women in Bollywood” celebrates with a five-part special, discussing the subject of heroine-oriented comebacks, that is, after actresses have taken some time away from the big screen and attempt a successful return.

As these breaks have typically, although not exclusively, coincided with developments in the personal lives of the heroines in question, the success or failure of these films have a wider implication in terms of a popular culture representation of changing societal expectations and acceptance of a woman’s continued career ambitions after marriage and childbirth, as well as opinions (changing or otherwise) on the compatibility of a maturing woman and the escapist glamour of commercial cinema.

That many of the films that witness an actress’ return to cinema after a multi-year break are heroine-oriented, this adds an extra level of relevance within the scope of this blog.

Notably, the actress Kajol’s two “comebacks” saw her star alongside  Aamir Khan in 2006’s “Fanaa”, and her long-term co-star Shah Rukh Khan in 2015’s “Dilwale”. Her roles were prominent but responsibility for the box office draw was shared with a major hero who had led a recent blockbuster hit.

This 5-part series will look rather at cases where the box office draw was left in the hands of a heroine absent from Hindi films for several years, and will discuss in each case – what worked, what didn’t and what could have been changed in terms of increasing the film’s success and positive reception.

Through these 5 films, released all in the last 10 years and showcasing a major heroine, a verdict will be reached on the premise of whether a heroine-oriented comeback is “cursed” or doomed to fail.

Curious?:

Five upcoming heroine-oriented movies to look out for!

So what are some of the yet-to-be-released flicks that this blog will update on and then discuss after release? Here are 5 upcoming heroine-oriented movies to make sure you look out for.

  1. Simran  – a 2017 release starring 100-crore heroine Kangana Ranaut

Due to the casting of Kangana, this film is bound to gain a lot of attention. There is less confirmed information available so far however about this movie than Kangana’s other release “Rangoon”.

It is understood that Kangana plays an NRI, and that her character is not actually named Simran (leading to the question – who is Simran?) but rather Praful Patel. Kangana is said to be playing a “negative character”. Is this an unusual portrayal of an anti-heroine lead?

Speculation abounds that Praful is based on real life bank robber Sandeep Kaur, dubbed the “Bombshell Bandit” after successfully robbing three banks across the US. Her full story can be found at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-32481834

It sounds a fascinating source to inspire a movie that’s for sure.

What we do have in terms of concrete information however is that the film is directed by Hansal Mehta, a National Film Award winner whose most recent release was “Aligarh”. A first look of Kangana in “Simran” has been released.

kangana-in-simran

2. “Noor” starring Sonakshi Sinha –

Noor sees Sonakshi Sinha team up with debut director Sunhil Sippy, her second heroine-oriented film after last month’s “Akira”. Unlike “Akira” – which saw Sonakshi as the action heroine spending most of the movie “kicking ass”, “Noor” appears to belong to the genre I’m dubbing “Lipstick Cinema” – as an entertainment-oriented portrayal of a lipstick feminist ideology. Such films have women as protagonists, and are generally designed for a female audience but embrace traditional markers of über-femininity. There are relatively few such films that have released in Bollywood, with the Sonam Kapoor-starrers “Aisha” and “Khoobsurat” springing to mind as recent examples.

The film is an adaptation of the book “Karachi, You’re Killing Me!” written by Pakistani journalist Saba Imtiaz and is due to release in April of next year.

With the book set in Karachi but relocated to Mumbai for the movie – there was some speculation that the character will remain Pakistani, which would have been an interesting retention given the paucity of Pakistani female characters in Hindi films (Preity Zinta in Veer Zaara and the young Munna [or “Shahida”] in Bajrangi Bhaijaan spring to mind), but Sinha has recently denied this, insisting this remains an Indian adaptation of a Pakistani book.

Poster for Noor.jpg

A poster already released (above) as has a teaser (below)

3. Phillauri – a film with Anushka Sharma as the lead –

Anushka Sharma’s latest home production following her intial producing credit for NH10 (another film due its own post), Phillauri is also a step away from the thriller genre of NH10, reportedly a much lighter affair comfortably described as a romantic comedy.

It has been speculated that Anushka is either playing a ghost or a witch – either option an unusual choice for your lead character!

First look is below

anushka-sharma-in-phillauri

Phillauri releases in March of next year and sees Punjabi music star and actor Diljit Donsanjh (who recently debuted in Bollywood with “Udta Punjab”) alongside Anushka, and was shot in the village of Phillaur and the city of Patiala, both in Punjab state, and is directed by newcomer Anshai Lal.

  1. Kahaani 2 – with of course, Vidya Balan

Due to release just next month, Vidya Balan’s “Kahaani 2” is a sequel to 2012’s superhit “Kahaani” (a film that warrants its own separate post soon).

Scheduled to release on the 25th November, Kahaani 2 goes up against SRK and Alia Bhatt’s “Dear Zindagi” at the box office in what is set to be the latest in a number of release date clashes between highly-hyped films.

However, if Kahaani 2 gets good word of mouth, combined with the regard the first film is still held in and Vidya’s acting chops, it should be able to overcome the impact of the release date clash.

Kahaani 2 appears to be set once again in Kolkata, which fans of Kahaani will remember, played a significant role in the movie, as a pseudo-character in of itself. Balan returns as assassin Vidya Bagchi, and Arjun Rampal joins the cast in a major role. Kahaani 2 sees Sujoy Ghosh return to directing for the first time since Kahaani.

The trailer is expected to come out alongside Ajay Devgan’s “Shivaay” which releases on the 28th October.

A still from the movie is below:

kahaani-2-still

5. Veere di Wedding – an ensemble piece with Kareena Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor

This is a movie I am particularly looking forward to for a number of reasons. Firstly, it’s a heroine-oriented film with two major stars – with Kareena Kapoor and Sonam Kapoor both acting in Veere di Wedding. To say this is not a common occurrence is beyond an understatement. If the film is a success and both actresses are credited for it, perhaps it could even start a trend that would see the lead actresses of Bollywood on screen together with greater frequency.

Equally, by featuring Kareena Kapoor in a lead role, it also shows her determination to remain in the industry despite family tradition, naysayers and the rules of Bollywood demanding she step out of the limelight now she’s married, over 35 and soon to be a mother. Whilst evidently benefitting from the privilege of the ultimate movie star last name, this refusal to “bow out gracefully” can break barriers for other women after her.

So what do we actually know about the movie itself? Well we know it is about a group of four friends at one of their weddings – the bride played by Kareena. The other three women are played by Sonam, Swara Bhaskar (previously in the Tanu Weds Manu movies, Raanjhanaa and Prem Ratan Dan Payo) and Shikha Tilsania (Wake Up Sid). It sees Sonam team up again with Khoobsurat direct Shakshanka Ghosh. VDW has been described as a “feel-good film” about an “emotional bond between friends”. Producer Rhea Kapoor (Sonam’s sister) has revealed it will shoot primarily in Delhi, with some overseas locations also being explored.

Beyond this – more is yet to be revealed, including the release date. From the information we have so far though, it appears to also fit into the “lipstick cinema” category, and if it plays up on the comedy aspect, I would not be surprised if it is being pitched as Bollywood’s answer to “Bridesmaids”.

kareena-and-sonam

Look – heroines can get along!

PLUS – a bonus three other heroine-oriented films which have been announced but for which there is still very limited information:-

  • Begum Jaan – another Vidya Balan movie releasing early next year. Allegedly Vidya plays a brothel’s madam during partition (already sounds amazing). Hopefully this will follow on from success with Kahaani 2.
  • Rani Mukherjee is set to make her return to the silver screen by playing the lead in a YRF biopic, directed by Siddarth Malhotra (not the actor, but rather the director of the Kajol/Kareena Kapoor/Arjun Rampal film “We Are Family”). Rumour mill is rife that this is a film turned down by Priyanka Chopra, and as PC was recently linked to a biopic of Kalpana Chawla, its possible this is the same film. Chawla, an Indian American astronaut, and the first Indian woman in space, lost her life aged only 40 (only two years older than Rani) in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster in 2003.
  • As yet unnamed heroine-oriented film starring Kajol – very little detail on this upcoming movie, reportedly Kajol’s next, with her as the protagonist in a movie starring a mother and son, it is produced by her husband Ajay Devgan’s production house but he does not star in the movie.

Enjoyed this post?

  • Check out “Queen” – which discuss Simran star Kangana Ranaut’s 2014 release, and why the film is groundbreaking and how it subverts expectations
  • Read about another powerhouse performance, Sonam Kapoor’s best to date, in “Neerja” and how the film presents the protagonist as a number of different archetypes
  • Learn what this blog is all about in “Introducing ‘Women in Bollywood‘”

Introducing “Women in Bollywood”

“Heroine-oriented” or “women-orientated” cinema is increasing its profile in Bollywood with a number of the most high-profile actresses at the top of their earning potential are choosing lead roles in films that would otherwise have been considered as of interest to only a niche audience, and perhaps only viable within the realms of parallel cinema as supposed to among more mainstream fare.

This includes the first “100 crore” plus grossing movie with a female protagonist releasing just last year, Kangana Ranaut’s “Tanu Weds Manu Returns”. This landmark in an industry dominated by the increasing box office returns of films led by a handful of male superstars (the “three Khans” paramount among these), sees a number of interesting debates arising both within and around these so-called “heroine-oriented” films – the term itself even causing significant controversy.

This blog will review and discuss releases in light of both their own artistic merit, themes discussed and explored within the films themselves, and within a wider context of women and girls’ rights within India, South Asia more widely and internationally, including the West.

An important disclaimer – I am not an Indian and a non-Hindi speaker, so this naturally leads to specific biases when watching these films and understanding and responding to them within a specific context. On the other hand, as a lover of Hindi cinema of many years now, but with also significant exposure to other countries’ and languages’ film making repertoire, I hope this provides a different perspective and some interesting insights. I am nevertheless grateful for any clarifications or additions from Indians and from Hindi speakers that I may have missed.